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4+ Surprising Benefits of Testimonials

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4+ Surprising Benefits of Testimonials by Vikram Rajan

{2:30 minutes to read} When we obtain a testimonial, we benefit in 4 ways:

1. When our clients say it in their own words, we’re able to fully understand the value that we’re providing. Sometimes testimonials on websites and brochures don’t sound “authentic” because they are not in the client’s actual words.

2. When clients express or vocalize the value that they have experienced, they are reiterating it to themselves too—essentially reaffirming their loyalty. If a competing vendor or practitioner comes knocking on their door, literally or figuratively, hopefully, their testimonial has already resold them.

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Protected: The 3 Benefits of a Strong Opening Sentence

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Do You Have Any Idea What Your Website Visitors Are Doing?

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Mark Bullock of phoneBlogger.net explains some blog site statistics vocabulary.Once you’ve made the decision to start authoring educational blog articles in order to boost your word-of-mouth referrals, you may find that some of the terminology is confusing at first – but knowing what it means can greatly improve your ability to maximize your site. For the purposes of this article we’re going to focus primarily on WordPress, but the same holds true for many of the different blogging platforms.

What is the difference between a new visitor and a returning visitor?

That question is usually decided by the cookies that are on the visitor’s browser. For instance, someone blocking cookies or clearing them out in between uses would be counted as a new visitor or, whereas a user with cookies would be counted as a returning visitor, if they’ve been to your site before.

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Redefining Social Media’s 80-20 Rule

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I just heard from a long­time client-turned-­friend that a speaker she heard was espousing the importance of spending 80% of our marketing time on personal connections – networking, public speaking and face­-to-­face meetings – and only 20% on social media.

Even though I run a company heavily immersed in social media, I don’t think the speaker’s too far off. Her definition of social media, however, is very different than mine.

You can connect to a dozen people per hour on LinkedIn, but the connection in and of itself is virtually meaningless.

The key is taking that connection and turning it into a relationship – whether by email, phone or in person – that is then maintained and nurtured.

When social media time ends, personal engagement time begins. I’ve recently begun replying to comments on my blog posts, which I syndicate on LinkedIn, with renewed vigor. One great way to fill your social media datebook is to spend time gathering the comments you generate on LinkedIn and adding them to the blog posts themselves for future readers. Continue reading